Sunday, October 27, 2019

Sometimes, you have to fire your client



Are you an independent practitioner? In the US, 1/3rd of the workforce are independents. An amazing proportion to my way of thinking.

One of the advantages -- and at the same time, one of the hazards -- is that you get to fire your boss; and, you even get to select your boss.

This essay gives a few pointers for the newbie independents -- know when to hold'em; know when to fold'em. You know you've got a bad client when:
  • They try to set up the deal at 10pm at night or a weekend... unless you want to work 24x7
  • They say it's an easy job they can do themselves.. unless you want to be micromanaged
  • They want to talk about themselves instead of the job task... unless you want to be their counselor
  • They say they've tried to get the job done with many others, and they all failed.. so might you!
  • Rude, insensitive behavior.. unless you like the bad-ass type
  • Those that ask for a miracle, or an unlimited commitment.. unless you give up your independence

One suggestion is to beef up the contract; guard your intellectual property rights (something I really pay attention to) and get a non-refundable down-payment. That one has been a sorting parameter for me. Don't forget the non-poaching clause: your client shouldn't have the freedom to hire your staff.

What's the right wording: "We're not a good fit", or "This job is not a good fit for my skills" (I use that one a lot)

And, if they really insist you take the job, add on a premium for your anticipated trouble!



Buy them at any online book retailer!

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